Public Service Recognition Week

This week the National Archives is celebrating Public Service Recognition Week. Today's post comes from Hailey Philbin in the National Archives History Office.  Since 1985, the first full week in May has been set aside to celebrate and thank the men and women who work in local, state, or Federal governments. Public Service Recognition Week … Continue reading Public Service Recognition Week

The Not-So-Lame Amendment

Today's post comes from Hailey Philbin in the National Archives History Office.  The 20th Amendment is often referred to as the Lame Duck Amendment. It was passed by Congress on March 2, 1932, and ratified on January 3, 1933. The amendment changed the date of the Presidential inauguration from March 4 to January 20. It … Continue reading The Not-So-Lame Amendment

Featured document: Tuskegee Airmen

At the start of World War II, African Americans serving in the Armed Forces were segregated into all-black units. They were also limited in the types of positions they could hold—blacks in the U.S. military did not fly planes. On April 3, 1939, Congress passed legislation expanding the Army Air Corps (the precursor to today’s … Continue reading Featured document: Tuskegee Airmen

On Exhibit: Abolishing Slavery

On December 6, 1865, with Georgia’s ratification of the 13th Amendment, slavery throughout the United States became illegal. Just a few years earlier, in 1861, Ohio Representative Thomas Corwin proposed—and both Houses of Congress passed—a constitutional amendment that would have done the exact opposite. Corwin’s amendment read, "No amendment shall be made to the Constitution which … Continue reading On Exhibit: Abolishing Slavery

Flight of a Sadako Crane

Today's post comes from Ben Jordi, Public Affairs Specialist in Strategy and Communications, at the National Archives in College Park, MD. Growing up, Clifton Truman Daniel never talked to his grandfather, Harry S. Truman, about his role in the war or the atomic bombings. “Our family met like any other family: on long weekends and … Continue reading Flight of a Sadako Crane

The Harry S. Truman Presidential Library: The 30-Year Journey

October is American Archives Month! We're celebrating the work of archivists and the importance of archives with a series of blog posts about the Presidential libraries. The records created by Presidents while in office will become part of the National Archives, and eventually will be used by researchers. Here's how it happens!  Today’s post comes … Continue reading The Harry S. Truman Presidential Library: The 30-Year Journey

Papal visits to the United States

Pope Francis’s visit this September marks the 10th time a Pope has visited the United States. Since the Federal Government is heavily involved in a papal visit, and the National Archives holds the records of the Federal Government, we have documents related to all these events. The first Pope to visit the United States was Pope Paul … Continue reading Papal visits to the United States

Fifty Year Later: A Brief History of the Immigration Act of 1965

Today’s post comes from Rebecca Brenner, an intern in the History Office at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. Fifty years ago on October 3, 1965, at the base of the Statue of Liberty, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Immigration Act of 1965 into law. The act was an important milestone in American immigration … Continue reading Fifty Year Later: A Brief History of the Immigration Act of 1965

Shaking Up History: Curator Bustard’s Artifact of Choice

Today’s post comes from Meagan Frenzer, graduate research intern for the National Archives History Office in Washington, DC. On display in the "Spirited Republic: Alcohol in American History" exhibit at the National Archives in Washington, DC, is a silver cocktail shaker and six cups that once belonged to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. As Governor of … Continue reading Shaking Up History: Curator Bustard’s Artifact of Choice

New Online Exhibit: The Temple of our History

Opened in 1935, the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, was created to hold the nation’s most important and influential documents in American history. The National Archives History Office has produced a new online exhibit on the National Archives Building, which is available in Google Cultural Institute. In the 19th century, historians and elected officials … Continue reading New Online Exhibit: The Temple of our History