Bill of Rights Day

December 15 is Bill of Rights Day which commemorates the ratification of the first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution.  As we celebrate the 225th anniversary of the Bill of Rights on December 15—Bill of Rights Day—let’s take a look back at the origins and history of that day. On December 15, 1791, the first 10 amendments … Continue reading Bill of Rights Day

Flight of a Sadako Crane

Today's post comes from Ben Jordi, Public Affairs Specialist in Strategy and Communications, at the National Archives in College Park, MD. Growing up, Clifton Truman Daniel never talked to his grandfather, Harry S. Truman, about his role in the war or the atomic bombings. “Our family met like any other family: on long weekends and … Continue reading Flight of a Sadako Crane

The Plot to Kill President Truman

Today’s post comes from Eric Rhodes, an intern in the National Archives History Office in Washington, DC. Assassins’ bullets have claimed the lives of four United States Presidents, and several other Presidents survived attempts on their lives. It is not widely known, but Harry Truman was the target of such a conspiracy. Thirteen years before … Continue reading The Plot to Kill President Truman

Hoover Library: Honoring Iowa’s only President

October is American Archives Month! We're celebrating the work of archivists and the importance of archives with a series of blog posts about the Presidential libraries. The records created by Presidents while in office will become part of the National Archives, and eventually will be used by researchers. Here's how it happens!  Herbert Hoover opened … Continue reading Hoover Library: Honoring Iowa’s only President

The Harry S. Truman Presidential Library: The 30-Year Journey

October is American Archives Month! We're celebrating the work of archivists and the importance of archives with a series of blog posts about the Presidential libraries. The records created by Presidents while in office will become part of the National Archives, and eventually will be used by researchers. Here's how it happens!  Today’s post comes … Continue reading The Harry S. Truman Presidential Library: The 30-Year Journey

On Display: The Japanese Instrument of Surrender

Today’s post comes from Darlene McClurkin, from the National Archives Exhibits staff. On September 2, 1945, in a formal ceremony aboard the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, Japan, representatives of the Japanese government signed this Instrument of Surrender, officially ending World War II. The terms called for “the unconditional surrender to the Allied Powers of … Continue reading On Display: The Japanese Instrument of Surrender

Take a break with Presidential vacations!

Need a vacation? This summer, go on a vacation with 13 of our Presidents!  You can choose your own adventure on Instagram and chat with us on Twitter on August 19 using #POTUSvacation.   Vacations are an integral part of Presidential history, a way for Presidents to relax and recharge outside of Washington. Many of … Continue reading Take a break with Presidential vacations!

Thursday Photo Caption Contest

Since this week's photo featured President Harry S. Truman, we turned to Tammy Kelly, an archivist at the Truman Library, to pick our winner for the photo contest. She has firsthand knowledge of this photo since she is the one who cataloged the doll into the Truman Library's computerized system earlier this summer. Tammy picked John … Continue reading Thursday Photo Caption Contest

“You’re Fired!”

Harry S. Truman was never really fond of Gen. Douglas MacArthur, especially after their frosty 1950 Wake Island meeting in the Pacific while the Korean War raged. Things had not gone particularly well since the North Koreans invaded South Korea in late June 1950. By October, South Korean troops had pushed across the 38th parallel, … Continue reading “You’re Fired!”