A Call to Public Service: the Peace Corps

This May we celebrate both Public Service Recognition Week and the centennial of the birth of a President closely associated with public service: John F. Kennedy.    In Kennedy’s first inaugural address, in 1961, he made his famous call to public service by asking Americans “to ask not what your country can do for you—ask what … Continue reading A Call to Public Service: the Peace Corps

Jeannette Rankin: The woman who voted to give women the right to vote

Today’s post comes from Christine Blackerby, an archives specialist with the Center for Legislative Archives at the National Archives in Washington, DC. 2017 marks the centennial of the swearing-in of the first woman to become a member of the U.S. Congress, Jeannette Rankin (R-Montana). A pacifist and suffragist, Rankin was elected to Congress four years … Continue reading Jeannette Rankin: The woman who voted to give women the right to vote

Special Exhibit: Alexander Hamilton’s Report on Manufactures

As the first Secretary of Treasury, Alexander Hamilton had a vision for the economic foundation of the country. Its three major components were the federal assumption of state debts, the creation of a Bank of the United States, and support for the nation’s emerging industries. His first and second reports to Congress dealt with the … Continue reading Special Exhibit: Alexander Hamilton’s Report on Manufactures

Carl Laemmle: Founder of Universal Studios and Humanitarian

Today’s post comes from Jim Zeender, Senior Registrar in the National Archives Exhibits Office. One of the founders of today’s Universal Studios, Carl Laemmle, was born to Jewish parents in Lupenheim, near Stuttgart, Germany, on January 17, 1867. Young Carl immigrated to Chicago in 1884 and became a naturalized citizen five years later. His Declaration … Continue reading Carl Laemmle: Founder of Universal Studios and Humanitarian

Slavery at George Washington’s Mount Vernon

Today's post comes from Jim Zeender, Senior Registrar in the National Archives Exhibits Office. On October 1, 2016, the Mount Vernon Museum opened a new and groundbreaking exhibition called “Lives Bound Together: Slavery at George Washington’s Mount Vernon.” The exhibition explores the long and complex relationship between George Washington and his slaves and his evolving attitudes … Continue reading Slavery at George Washington’s Mount Vernon

A Trip to Williamsburg

Today's post comes from Jim Zeender, Senior Registrar in the National Archives Exhibits Program in Washington, DC.  In early September I had the pleasure of taking a train to Williamsburg, Virginia. I have taken trains to Philadelphia, New York, and New Haven numerous times. Overseas, I have been on trains in England, France, Austria and Switzerland. … Continue reading A Trip to Williamsburg

On Exhibit: An Act to establish the NMAAHC

The Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) officially opens on September 24, 2016, on the National Mall. It is the 19th and newest Smithsonian Institution museum and is devoted to documenting African American life, history, and culture. The museum was established by a December 16, 2003, act of Congress, but efforts to create … Continue reading On Exhibit: An Act to establish the NMAAHC

Amending America: the 14th Amendment

Join one of the “Amending America” exhibit curators Christine Blackerby for a Facebook Live video on the  Huffington Post Politics page. On July 9, 1868, the Fourteenth amendment to the U.S. Constitution became law. It is arguably the most important of the 27 amendments. The amendment originated after the Civil War when Congress attempted to pass … Continue reading Amending America: the 14th Amendment

National Archives Celebrates Pride Month

Today’s post comes from Andrew Grafton in the National Archives History Office. This June the National Archives will join Americans across the United States and abroad in celebrating National Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month, which honors the important contributions that LGBTQ+ Americans have made to United States history and culture. Pride Month traces … Continue reading National Archives Celebrates Pride Month

Elizabeth Hamer Kegan: Educator and Innovator

The National Archives History Office continues to celebrate Women’s History Month with stories of former employees. Today’s post comes from Kaitlin Errickson. Elizabeth “Betty” Hamer Kegan was an archival pioneer. As a founding member of the Society of American Archivists (SAA) and lead supporter of the Freedom Train, she sought to make history and archives … Continue reading Elizabeth Hamer Kegan: Educator and Innovator