On Exhibit: Voting Rights Act of 1965

Today’s post comes from Alex Nieuwsma, an intern in the National Archives History Office in Washington, DC. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 is a milestone in American history. President Lyndon B. Johnson signed it on August 6, 1965, marking the culmination of decades of efforts toward African American equality. The 15th Amendment, passed in 1870, … Continue reading On Exhibit: Voting Rights Act of 1965

Jackie Kennedy: Queen of Camelot and Style Icon of the 1960s

Today’s post comes from Marisa Hawley, intern in the National Archives Strategy and Communications office. As part of the "six weeks of style" celebration to recognize the Foundation for the National Archives' partnership with DC Fashion Week, we are showcasing fashion-related records from our holdings. This week’s fashion theme is 1960s: The Times (and Fashion) They Are A' … Continue reading Jackie Kennedy: Queen of Camelot and Style Icon of the 1960s

On exhibit: Gulf of Tonkin Resolution

Today’s post comes from Darlene McClurkin, National Archives Exhibits staff member. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution. The original resolution is on display in the East Rotunda Gallery of the National Archives Building from July 15 to August 7, 2014. Fifty years ago, the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution marked a major turning point … Continue reading On exhibit: Gulf of Tonkin Resolution

Now On Display: The Civil Rights Act of 1964

Today’s post comes from David Steinbach, intern in the National Archives History Office. On July 2, 1964, with Martin Luther King, Jr., directly behind him, President Lyndon Johnson scrawled his signature on a document years in the making—the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the landmark legislation. The first … Continue reading Now On Display: The Civil Rights Act of 1964

They “Leaned In” and took action in federal courts

Happy Women's History Month! Today's blog post comes from Kristina Jarosik, education specialist at the National Archives at Chicago. Recently, two powerful women in the Silicon Valley, (Sheryl Sandberg of Facebook and author of Lean In: Women Work and the Will to Lead and Marissa Meyer, CEO of Yahoo) provided the media and the public the … Continue reading They “Leaned In” and took action in federal courts

“The whole world mourns his passing”

Today's blog post comes from Corinne Porter, curator at the National Archives Building in Washington, DC. November 22, 2013, marks the 50th anniversary of the death of President John F. Kennedy. On that day in 1963, the news of President Kennedy’s tragic death shocked the world and plunged the United States into mourning. Although five … Continue reading “The whole world mourns his passing”

National Archives documents on display at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History

Some of our documents made a special trip across Constitution Avenue today, traveling from the National Archives Building to our neighbor on the Mall, the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. Tonight, the museum is hosting a dinner for this year's sixteen recipients of the nation's highest civilian honor: the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Over … Continue reading National Archives documents on display at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History

The Remarkable Story of Ann Lowe: From Alabama to Madison Avenue

Today's guest post comes from Margaret Powell, MA, a decorative arts historian from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Her areas of concentration are textile and costume history. She is a graduate of the Smithsonian Associates–Corcoran College of Art and Design History of Decorative Arts Masters Program. On September 13, 1953, the New York Times featured the wedding of … Continue reading The Remarkable Story of Ann Lowe: From Alabama to Madison Avenue

What’s Cooking Wednesday: Top Ten Food Records of 2011

As 2011 draws to a close, so does our exhibit "What's Cooking, Uncle Sam?" which will end on January 3, 2012. It's been a great year for food here at the National Archives. We've had amazing guests come and speak, including Chef José Andrés, our neighbor and Chief Culinary Adviser for the exhibit; Chef Roland … Continue reading What’s Cooking Wednesday: Top Ten Food Records of 2011

Hit the Road, Jack!

Today's post is by Miriam Kleiman, public relations specialist at the National Archives. Jack Kerouac—American counterculture hero, king of the Beats, and author of On the Road—was a Navy military recruit who failed boot camp. Navy doctors found Kerouac delusional, grandiose, and promiscuous, and questioned his strange writing obsession. I learned this in 2005, right … Continue reading Hit the Road, Jack!